the ceo magazine, leadership skills,
Jeffrey McIntosh, CEO, Teabook

CEOs can be compared to tea leaves; you never know their strength until they’re dunked in hot water.

Not only that, CEO’s leadership skills must drive revenues, company growth, employee development and impact their communities and industry eco-systems. 

Which is why I’d like to give you a front row seat while I share my personal hot tea story:  how gaining understanding of the nuances of fine Chinese tea ended up teaching me the skills I need to lead my enterprise, while driving personal growth, commitment to social impact, and understanding of the importance of micro-enterprise and agriculture.  Plus, of course, an outsized and lifelong love of perfectly-brewed tea.

Is there someone you work with who could use a little motivation?  Could you use a little motivation? You can’t motivate someone else if you can’t motivate yourself and, frankly, we could all use a little motivation sometime. Too often we think of motivation as money or a promotion but intrinsic motivation comes from inside and is powerful.  How can you leverage findings about brain function to connect with intrinsic motivation? There are five ways to aid your brain or other’s brains to feel motivated by feeling rewarded. 

the ceo magazine, motivation,

In 2016, Wells Fargo fired more than 5,000 employees who learned the hard way that carrots don’t work—at least not in the long run. Decision-makers tied a substantial piece of these employees’ compensation to steep sales targets and made reaching them a condition of continued employment. They saw movement, if not true motivation. Even when launched with the best of intentions—which the leaders at Wells Fargo did not display—evidence shows that carrots-as-motivators ultimately fail. Incentives designed to spur workers to do their best can push them to engage in unethical behavior—to do their worst. 

the ceo magazine, leadership tips,
Shayne Hughes & Brandon Black, Authors, Ego Free Leadership

A workplace without politics is as mythical as a unicorn. But when those politics undermine company morale, it’s time to take a closer look—before they cut into the bottom line.

Brandon Black was grappling with an all-too-familiar scenario in his then workplace. The erstwhile CEO of Encore Capital was struggling to grow the company given the challenging industry conditions. It didn’t help that a number of Encore’s leaders were locking horns with each other over a range of issues. Brandon himself was butting heads with one of his key executives, Dave.

No matter how hard they tried, Brandon and Dave couldn’t seem to communicate effectively with each other. To a bystander, their bickering would have recalled a married couple caught in a downward spiral—you know, conversations going nowhere, with each assuming the other was the problem, and that their communication would improve if only the other changed their behavior.

the ceo magazine, manage fear,
Andy Molinsky, Professor of Organizational Behavior, Brandeis International Business School

“Very few people, whether you’ve been in that job before or not, get into the seat and believe today that they are now qualified to be the CEO. They’re not going to tell you that, but it’s true.”

Howard Schultz, CEO of Starbucks

In 2014 Roger Jones, chief executive of Vantage Hill Partners, a London-based consulting firm, did a fascinating study of the things that CEO’s fear the most.  You may think you could quite easily predict the results: a failing economy… foreign competition… the price of labor… but as it turns out, their biggest fear was something far more personal and insidious:  it was the fear of failing – and, to be even more specific, the fear of being viewed as a fake or a fraud.

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