Dianna Booher

Dianna Booher works with organizations to improve their productivity through clear communication and with individuals to increase their impact by a stronger executive presence.

Have you ever met a manager who intended to motivate staff but instead demoralized them?  Most have no idea of their negative effect. And that’s definitely not their intention. In talking with such managers or those who report to them, what surfaces are habits, attitudes, practices, and skill deficiencies that lead employees to disrespect, disengage, and decide to leave them for a more pleasant workplace.

The first day I sauntered into Miss Amos’s English class, I was scared. Not because of the subject or because this was my first day in a big city school—I was startled by her face. My first thought: Did some terrible disease do this to her?

“He’s fast on his feet” or “She has a clear head on her shoulders.” “He’s definitely a thought-leader in the industry.” These current kudos pique a leader’s attention. After all, leaders look to hire, promote, and listen to those who think clearly and communicate well.

But what if you’re naturally quiet and slow to speak up in a crowd?  How do people really gauge how well you think—particularly when your interactions are brief and infrequent?  Can you still convey the same sense of being an astute, clear thinker as your more outgoing colleagues?

I think you can.

Ever find yourself on a team or in an organization that’s struggling because of a leader’s poor decision? Citizens clamor about such crippling effects by their politicians routinely. You sit back and reflect on the leader personally and wonder why a savvy, experienced, and ordinarily capable person could make such a stupid decision or policy—one that wrecks a project or destroys the morale of so many people.

Many people today talk about leadership who’ve never led anything more complex than a high school marching band.  They offer this or that principle as if proven under fire when, in fact, their experience has been limited to launching missiles in a game of Battleship.

But that’s not to say that you can’t learn from these neophytes or even failed leaders. On the contrary. As volunteers or especially as victims in their experiments, you often have a front-row seat to observe their inappropriate actions and inactions. You learn not to repeat their leadership lapses:

Pages

Follow The Blog

   Email * 
Subscribe to Syndicate

Blog Categories

Blog Authors

kajabi
eclub

EC

ad5
ad6

ad7

ad8


Contacts

Managing Editor
Nick Vaidya
Editor
Faisal Kalim

The CEO Magazine

7301 Hwy 620 N, Ste 155-165
Austin, TX 78726-4539
T: +1 (512)-257-7868
F: +1 (512)-257-7869
Toll Free: +1 (800)-210-1951

Who Are We?

Published by The 8020Strategy Group, the magazine is complementary to the highly successful CEO Show and brings highly focused topics in every issue that Entrepreneurs and Executive can readily benefit from in managing growth.